Wednesday, December 9, 2015

Rarity from the Hollow by Robert Eggleton

Rarity from the Hollow
by Robert Eggleton
Publication Date: March 11, 2012
Publisher: Dog Horn Publishing
Genre: Satire
Print Length: 284 pages
Available from: Amazon

Lacy Dawn is a little girl who lives in a magical forest where all the trees love her and she has a space alien friend who adores her and wants to make her queen of the universe. What’s more, all the boys admire her for her beauty and brains. Mommy is very beautiful and Daddy is very smart, and Daddy’s boss loves them all.

Except.

Lacy Dawn, the eleven year old protagonist, perches precariously between the psychosis of childhood and the multiple neuroses of adolescence, buffeted by powerful gusts of budding sexuality and infused with a yearning to escape the grim and brutal life of a rural Appalachian existence. In this world, Daddy is a drunk with severe PTSD, and Mommy is an insecure wraith. The boss is a dodgy lecher, not above leering at the flat chest of an eleven-year-old girl.

Yes, all in one book.

It is a children's story for adults with a happily ever after ending.

 
Rarity from the Hollow by Robert Eggleton 

Rarity from the HollowWhat appears at first blush to be a wonderful vehicle to bring attention to child abuse and the horrific lives these children live, as well as the suffering of victims of PTSD and their families, became a convoluted tale of one young girl, whose life has been damaged and skewed, forcing her into her own world of self-protection. Pre-teen, young teen, Lacy Dawn is intelligent, but damaged. She still plays with her best friend, whose own father abused and killed her. Then there is her alien friend, the naked with no-gender obvious traits that she is in love with. She also wants desperately to “fix” her parents and her friend, Dot Com has offered to help.

Rarity from the Hollow by Robert Eggleton is pure satire, twisted, and his composite may best be stretched over more than one child. I found I was so sad for Lacy Dawn with her obsession with her panties, showing her panties and giving herself to Dot Com, while clearly not realizing he/she/it had no appropriate body parts. Her internal dialogue was disturbing, as was most of this tale, not because I do not want to think that children actually live with abuse, but this did not come across as a well-developed expose, satire or not to positively support their situations. I did read this from cover to cover and never got that feeling of connection.

I would recommend to purchase this for the organization it benefits, or just donate to a child abuse agency in your own area directly, where every penny will go to help children in crisis.

I received this copy from Robert Eggleston in exchange for my honest review.
*PLEASE NOTE - THE AUTHOR STATES THE PROCEEDS FROM THIS NOVEL ARE GIVEN TO ORGANIZATIONS THAT DIRECTLY DEAL WITH IMPOVERISHED OR ABUSED CHILDREN IN CRISIS. THE CHARACTERS ARE COMPOSITES OF CHILDREN HE HAS ACTUALLY WORKED WITH.
Children's Home Society of West Virginia. http://www.childhswv.org/




 

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